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Image “Can’t see the forest for the trees”. What an apt statement. Ironically, it is one of those idioms that you only really ‘get’ once you can see the forest for the trees. I have found myself in many many situations where people have chucked that quote at my face. Almost every single time I have thought, mostly to myself, one of the following “forest blinded” thoughts:

  • The person chucking this idiom does not understand the situation.
  • If this idiom chucker was in my situation, they would be able to understand that I can see the whole deal.
  • What does “not seeing the forest for the trees” even mean?
  • People don’t understand love.
  • People don’t understand me.
  • People don’t understand the situation.
  • People don’t understand the idiom.
  • HOW CAN YOU NOT SEE THE FOREST WHEN A FOREST IS MADE UP OF BLOODY TREES??

I remember the time I thought the last thought in that list, and I did shout it. The point is that when you are too focused on the intricacies of a given situation, you forget to take a step back and look at the it as a whole. Once you do, however, you kinda always end up thinking “How did I land up in that situation in the first place?”.

The only real solution that I have been able to come up with is to assume, at any given point, that there is a possibility that I may be wrong, as well as right. You do not necessarily have to make any drastic decisions straight away, but it does allow an opportunity to put the ego aside for a second and look at the situation with fresh eyes. Is this serving me? Do I really want this? And most importantly; Is this worth the trouble?

That last one always seems to grab me. I am a hopeless romantic, and when you have watched ‘The Notebook’ as many times as I have, any morass may end up being worth it. TRAP!! TRAAAAAP!
Readdress once it is worth it. And it doesn’t mean that you are giving up too easily, yet another trap I have fallen into. It simply means, “right now it is not worth the trouble” because if it was worth the trouble, you wouldn’t be having this monologue.

The mind always seems to trap you in a maze of morals, dazzle you with labyrinth of lies and guilt you with a hodgepodge of hullabaloo. Take a step back. Look at what serves you, reassess THEN decide. Take note of the idiom chucker and what they are saying, perspective is always good. You don’t have agree or use it, but listening never hurt.

Forests are great, but not when you get lost in them.

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